The effects of the Marie Kondo method

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Marie Chaissac - Las faldas de Gaston in Barcelona
Gaston in barcelona - method marie kondo

I imagine that as me you have been touched by the famous Marie Kondo method. For my part, I started hearing about the subject a little over a year ago, when my sister was offered “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying“, the book that explains the procedure to follow.

And more recently, I discovered the Netflix series where Marie Kondo, herself, goes to American families and helps them tidy their home and their lives at the same time through various stages. Out of curiosity, I watched the first episode. I advise you to do so to understand the logic of the method.

The KonMari method

For people disconnected or having decided to live on an other planet lately, I’ll briefly explain the subject to you.

Marie Kondo is Japanese and passionate about tidying. Her method is to clean up your house to feel happy. First of all we must start by imagining a space that makes us happy, we can take inspiration from decorating magazines to visualize an environment that pleases us. From this picture we can start the big cleaning up.

Marie Kondo recommends starting with clothes. For this she has developed a whole process to feel the effect clothes has on us: does it make us happy? If so, we keep it, if not, we say goodbye to it and thank it for his good and loyal services. The Kondo method also allows you to fold and store clothes in a different way, freeing up space in your drawers. If you are interested you will find videos explaining the method.

We then go on to books, papers, and other objects, and end with objects of high sentimental value and memories, which are more difficult to give up.

The goal is then to store each element in boxes, dividers, baskets or other.

Some numbers

The method would produce an average of 20 to 30 trash bags of 45 liters for a single person and nearly 70 liters for a family of 3 people.

Marie Kondo advocates donating clothing and unused items to associations, second-hand stores or other.

Second-hand shops have seen an increase in donations growing in recent months. Ravenswood Used Books, in Chicago, received the equivalent of a month’s worth of used book donations in a week, after being virtually invisible to consumers.

Source: https://www.epochtimes.fr/

Sue Ryder’s office manager in Camden says the charity store is getting 30 big bags a day, twice as much as one would normally expect.

Source: https://news-24.fr/

The longer-term implications

The Marie Kondo method seems very interesting if we rely on the fact that people get rid of clothes and objects that are now useless.

It also seems to me totally positive to make donations to associations, especially if these objects are still of very good quality and can make other people happy.

My worry is on the trendy effect. Are we all ready to adopt a minimalist lifestyle? Isn’t the change too radical and are we not likely to end up with our closet full again in 6 months?

I would say that adopting a minimalist life is a process. We need to become aware at first of why we want to adopt this way of life: for social, environmental or other reasons. These values ​​will allow us to resist in time and have a referent in our future choices.

The months and years to come will tell us whether these changes are sustainable or not. It would be interesting to return to the families of the Netflix serie visited by Marie Kondo 1 year later to see the duration of the effects.

@all: convinced by the KonMari method? Did you adopt it at home?

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